canvas

   Commonly used as a support a swatch of canvasfor oil or acrylic painting, canvas is a heavy woven fabric made of flax or cotton. Its surface is typically prepared for painting by priming with a ground. Linen — made of flax — is the standard canvas, very strong, sold by the roll and by smaller pieces. A less expensive alternative to linen is heavy cotton duck, though it is less acceptable (some find it unacceptable), cotton being less durable, because it's more prone to absorb dampness, and it's less receptive to grounds and size. For use in painting, a piece of canvas is stretched tightly by stapling or tacking it to a stretcher frame. A painting done on canvas and then cemented to a wall or panel is called marouflage. Canvas board is an inexpensive, commercially prepared cotton canvas which has been primed and glued to cardboard, suitable for students and amateurs who enjoy its portability. Also, a stretched canvas ready for painting, or a painting made on such fabric. Canvas is abbreviated c., and "oil on canvas" is abbreviated o/c.

Glossary of Art Terms. 2014.

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  • Canvas — is an extremely heavy duty plain woven fabric used for making sails, tents, marquees, backpacks, and other functions where sturdiness is required. It is also popularly used as a painting surface, typically stretched, and on fashion handbags and… …   Wikipedia

  • Canvas — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Canvas es una etiqueta o elemento en HTML que permite la generación de graficos en forma dinámica por medio de programación dentro de una pagina. Inicialmente lo implementó Apple para Safari. Luego fue adoptado por… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Canvas — There are many fabrics termed canvas. The principal kinds are: Cloths for embroidering, which are very strong, plain weave, from two, three or fourfold yarns, and a more or less open texture. Java Canvas is a fabric made from hard twist, yarns… …   Dictionary of the English textile terms

  • Canvas — Can vas, n. [OE. canvas, canevas, F. canevas, LL. canabacius hempen cloth, canvas, L. cannabis hemp, fr. G. ?. See {Hemp}.] 1. A strong cloth made of hemp, flax, or cotton; used for tents, sails, etc. [1913 Webster] By glimmering lanes and walls… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • canvas — ► NOUN (pl. canvases or canvasses) 1) a strong, coarse unbleached cloth used to make sails, tents, etc. 2) a piece of canvas prepared for use as the surface for an oil painting. 3) (the canvas) the floor of a boxing or wrestling ring, having a… …   English terms dictionary

  • canvas — [kan′vəs] n. [ME & OFr canevas < It canavaccio < VL * cannapaceum, hempen cloth < L cannabis, HEMP] 1. a closely woven, coarse cloth of hemp, cotton, or linen, often unbleached, used for tents, sails, etc. 2. a sail or set of sails 3. a) …   English World dictionary

  • Canvas — Can vas, a. Made of, pertaining to, or resembling, canvas or coarse cloth; as, a canvas tent. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Canvas — (deutsch „Leinwand“, „Leinen“) bezeichnet: Canvas (Fernsehsender), ein Fernsehprogramm des Flämischen Rundfunks VRT Canvas (HTML Element), Element der Auszeichnungssprache HTML Leinwand, ein Gewebe, das in der Malerei als Farbträger dient …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • canvas — canvas, canvass 1. Canvas with one s means ‘coarse cloth’. The plural is canvases and as a verb (‘to cover or line with canvas’) it has inflected forms canvasses, canvassed, canvassing. 2. Canvass with two s s is a verb meaning ‘to solicit votes’ …   Modern English usage

  • canvas — mid 14c., from Anglo Fr. canevaz, from O.Fr. canevas, from V.L. *cannapaceus made of hemp, from L. cannabis, from Gk. kannabis hemp, a Scythian or Thracian word. Canvas back as a type of N.Amer. duck is from 1785 …   Etymology dictionary

  • canvas — [n1] coarse material awning cloth, duck, fly, sailcloth, shade, tarp, tarpaulin, tenting; concept 473 canvas [n2] painting on coarse material art, artwork, oil, picture, piece, portrait, still life, watercolor; concept 259 …   New thesaurus

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